Monthly Archives: July 2014

Making internal types visible to another assembly

You just have to sign the assembly that wants to use the internals with a key (usually a .snk file) and put this in the AssemblyInfo.cs

 

[assemblyInternalsVisibleTo(“(name of assembly that wants to see the internals), PublicKey=(public key)”)]

 

Notice that you have to put the public key and the name of the assembly that wants to see the internals. This is especially interesting when Unit Testing, since you may want to inject dependencies using some internal constructor and internal types.

 

The extract the public key you may use the sn.exe (Strong Name Utility) that comes with Visual Studio and can be used from the Developer Command Prompt (serach “Visual Studio Tools” using the Windows Search J)

 

Happy testing, buddies!

The Most Simple SignalR application

Download the ZIP containing the solution here! => The Most Simple SignalR App!

Hey boy, if you want to create a SignalR and you’re like me, you will appreciate this. A .zip file containing a SUPER BASIC ASP.NET application and a Console Client that uses SignalR and one Hub to retrieve a fixed list invoking a remote method 🙂

KEEP INTO ACCOUNT that the URL that you use to create the connection matters! This simple solution uses IIS Express, that has to be configured accordingly. You will have to go to this file

C:\Users\[YourUser]\IIExpress\Config\applicationhost.config

Open it and  under the <sites> tag you should see something list this:



bindingInformation contains the expression that will determine which URLs are accepted to connect to the service.

As you see, it says “localhost”. This means that you will connect to the service using a URL like http://localhost:1444/

NOTICE that it will fail if you use your actual private IP address! So if your client tries to connect using http://192.168.1.33:1444  the connection will be rejected and an exception will be thrown.

dhh.GetType();

David Heinemeier Hansson (https://twitter.com/dhh):
Mixed feelings about him. Smart guy, wrong lane. Always in my opinion, of course.

He is a very representative developer that exposes the Anti-Microsoft syndrome. Let’s watch him talk in what I think it’s a flaunting of pride and empty self-satisfaction.

I’m not saying he’s a bad guy, but this gratuitous bash is completely unnecessary, unless he is just another hater. I’m feed up with presumptuous arguments like those.